Sensors For Health And Wellbeing

Sensors For Health And Wellbeing
Exploring internet connected sensors to improve health and wellbeing
The Sensors for Health and Wellbeing project is investigating how low-cost internet connected sensors might improve healthcare service delivery and wellbeing. The project seeks to understand the potential benefits to health and wellbeing from low-cost internet-connected sensor technologies in the home; to understand how clinicians and 3rd sector organisations might use the data from such technologies to improve health care delivery; and, to understand how these devices might be reimagined to promote better wellbeing for the people whose homes they are in. 
Sensors for Health and Wellbeing project ran alongside a pilot study steered by Blackburn with Darwen County Council deploying pairs of these sensors in 100 homes to improve the wellbeing of persons aged 50+ living in single occupancy homes. 

Project Team

CruickshankCruickshank Leon Cruickshank Open Design and Innovation, User Centred and User-Led Design, Interactive Design, Technology and Society, Design Methodology, Design Theory and Philosophy
LongLong Kiel Long Human-Computer Interaction, Interactive artefact design, Designing for health and wellbeing, Mindfulness and Mindlessness

Updates

Project partners presentation and design considerations

Articleby Kiel Long, Leon Cruickshank

Building on the knowledges gained through engagements with people aged 50+ and health professionals, a presentation of findings and design considerations was given to the Sensors for health and wellbeing project partners and other interested parties from the health, public, and 3rd sectors. ...Read full article

One-to-one interviews with health professionals

Articleby Kiel Long, Leon Cruickshank

With increasing austerity measures and an ageing population, the healthcare sector is continually seeking ways to reduce cost and improve service and care delivery for older adults. With internet connected devices becoming increasingly accessible and affordable, sensor technologies in individual’s homes to assist and improve healthy living is revealing its face as the next step in the future of healthcare. ...Read full article

One-to-one interviews and co-design workshops with persons aged 50+ living in single occupancy homes

Articleby Kiel Long, Leon Cruickshank
One-to-one interviews and co-design workshops with persons aged 50+ living in single occupancy homes

While still relatively new, “smart” internet connected healthcare technologies have seen significant development and effort, seeking to reduce the cost of healthcare and improve service delivery. These devices are characterised as physical objects of some sensing capability connected to a network; integrating physical world information into digital systems. ...Read full article

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